Monday, December 9, 2013

NSF funds Harvard-led Science and Technology Center for Integrated Quantum Materials

NSF funds Harvard-led Science and Technology Center for Integrated Quantum Materials


The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently awarded $20 million to fund a new Science and Technology Center, the Center for Integrated Quantum Materials. During the next five years, the multi-institution center will support science and education programs that explore the unique electronic behavior of quantum materials.

[caption id="attachment_204" align="aligncenter" width="500"]NSF funds Harvard-led Science and Technology Center for Integrated Quantum Materials www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-022 NSF funds Harvard-led Science and Technology Center for Integrated Quantum Materials[/caption]

Researchers will examine materials such as graphene, a potential replacement for silicon in today's computer chips. Graphene is thinner, lighter and stronger and may work at room temperature, which could eliminate the need for bulky cooling apparatus in computers of all sizes.

"As we move into a post-silicon age, quantum materials are an emerging technology with enormous promise for science and engineering and for our country's overall economy in the form of new products and business opportunities," said Robert M. Westervelt, Mallinckrodt Professor of Applied Physics and Physics at Harvard, who will lead the center. "The scientists collaborating on this project have a vision of future quantum materials and quantum devices--new devices and systems that were not conceived to be possible 10 years ago. This line of research promises an impressive trajectory over the coming decades."

"All ingredients for substantive scientific progress are present in the Center for Integrated Quantum Materials," said Daniele Finotello, NSF program director for Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers, and technical adviser for the award. "Originality, creativity and depth, breadth and diversity of scientific ideas of participating scientists and of contributing institutions--we look forward to exciting discoveries and future applications in the years ahead."

The Harvard-led Center for Integrated Quantum Materials will draw on expertise in materials synthesis, nanofabrication, characterization and device physics by partnering with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Museum of Science in Boston and Howard University in Washington, D.C.

"The integration of expertise and partners across diverse disciplines and institutions bodes well for the success of the Center for Integrated Quantum Materials in realizing breakthroughs in this important field." said NSF program director Dragana Brzakovic, who manages NSF's Science and Technology Centers program.

The center will also encourage students to pursue careers in science and engineering through an affiliated college network that will attract students from diverse backgrounds to science and engineering and provide them with unique opportunities for scholarship and leadership. Two prestigious women's colleges, Mount Holyoke and Wellesley, as well as Gallaudet University, which focuses on undergraduate liberal arts education, career development and graduate programs for the deaf, will engage young people who are traditionally less represented in science and engineering. Massachusetts' Bunker Hill Community College, with its special recruitment program for military veterans, and Olin College of Engineering, with its technical focus, will each bring different perspectives to the collaboration, as will Prince's George's Community College in Maryland.

The new Center for Integrated Quantum Materials is funded as part of NSF's Science and Technology Center (STC) program, which supports integrative partnerships that require large-scale, long-term investments to pursue world class research and education. Existing STCs study a wide range of complex scientific topics, such as atmospheric modeling, life beneath the sea floor, energy-efficient electronics, water purification techniques and cybersecurity. Harvard's proposal was one of three selected this year through a merit-based competition.
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For more details on the science and engineering pursued by the Center for Integrated Quantum Materials, please see Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences webpage.

NSF also announced this month another Science and Technology Center, Center for Brains, Minds and Machines led by Tomaso Poggio at MIT. This Center aims at better understanding human intelligence and building smarter machines.

News Release Source : http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-09/nsf-nfh092513.php

Sunday, November 24, 2013

NIST demonstrates how losing information can benefit quantum computing

NIST demonstrates how losing information can benefit quantum computing


BOULDER, Colo -- Suggesting that quantum computers might benefit from losing some data, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have entangled—linked the quantum properties of—two ions by leaking judiciously chosen information to the environment.

Researchers usually strive to perfectly shield ions (charged atoms) in quantum computing experiments from the outside world. Any "noise" or interference, including heat generated by the experiment and measurements that cause fragile quantum states to collapse, can ruin data and prevent reliable logic operations, the conventional approach to quantum information processing.

Turning bug into feature, a collaboration of physicists from NIST and the University of Copenhagen in Denmark decided to think and work outside the box. They cleverly linked the experiment to the outside world to establish and maintain the entanglement of two ions. Entanglement is a curious feature of the quantum world that will be necessary to process and transport quantum data or correct errors in future quantum computers.

The new research is described in a Nature paper posted online Nov. 24,* along with similar work at Yale University using superconducting circuits.

"These new methods might be used to create entangled states that would be a resource in a traditional, logic-based quantum computer," NIST postdoctoral researcher John Gaebler says. "But there are also alternative architectures in which, for example, one couples a quantum computer to a specific noise environment and the resulting state of the computer contains the solution to the target problem."

The NIST experiments used two beryllium ions as quantum bits (qubits) to store quantum information and two partner magnesium ions, which were cooled with three ultraviolet laser beams to release heat.

The qubits were entangled by two ultraviolet laser beams and induced to "leak" any unwanted quantum states to the environment through continuous application of microwaves and one laser beam. The unwanted data were coupled to the outgoing heat in such a way that the qubits were left in only the desired entangled state—which happens to be the point of lowest motional energy, where no further heat and information is released to the environment.

Unlike a logic operation, the process can be started from any state of the ions and still yield the same final state. The scheme also can tolerate some kinds of noise that might cause a traditional logic gate to fail. For instance, the lasers and microwaves had no negative effects on the target entangled state but reshuffled any unwanted states.

All operations applied at the same time quickly drove the two qubits into a specific entangled state and kept them in that state most of the time. The qubits approached the target state within a few milliseconds and were found to be in the correct entangled state 75 percent of the time. The qubit state deteriorated slightly over longer times as the qubits were disturbed by errant laser emissions. By applying about 30 repetitions of the four steps in a particular order, scientists boosted the success rate to 89 percent in a separate experiment.

Co-authors of the paper include two collaborators at QUANTOP, The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen. The work was supported in part by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, Office of Naval Research, and the European Union's Seventh Framework Program.

* Y. Lin, J.P. Gaebler, F. Reiter, T.R. Tan, R. Bowler, A.S. Sorensen, D. Leibfried and D.J. Wineland. Dissipative production of a maximally entangled steady state. Nature. Posted online Nov. 24, 2013.

Sidebar: How Lost Data Generates Entanglement

The NIST process for using lost data to generate entanglement works like this: Two ultraviolet laser beams entangle the two ion qubits' internal "spins," analogous to tiny bar magnets pointing up or down. The lasers are carefully tuned to couple the ions' synchronized, back-and-forth sideways motion to their spins, entangling this motion with the spins.

The spins have three possible correlations: Both qubits spin up, both spin down, or one is up and one is down. The desired entangled state is a superposition of spins up-down and down-up at the same time. Superposition is another special feature of the quantum world. A measurement of this state with another special-purpose laser beam causes quantum states to collapse, resulting in spins up-down, or the opposite, spins down-up. Such measurements are made by detecting light signals; spin up scatters laser light, whereas spin down does not.

If the two spins are in the desired entangled state and the lowest motional energy state, they are unaffected by all laser and microwave fields. But microwaves and one ultraviolet laser beam reshuffle all other spin states and at the same time boost the qubits to an intermediate state with higher motional energy. This energy is then removed from the qubits by three cooling laser beams applied to the magnesium ions. This continuous feedback loop alters the qubits spins until they settle into the entangled state that is no longer affected by the driving fields.

News Release Source : http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/nios-ndh112113.php

Friday, November 15, 2013

Overcoming a Key Barrier Towards Building Ultrafast Quantum Computers

Overcoming a Key Barrier Towards Building Ultrafast Quantum Computers




15 November 2013




A normally fragile quantum state has been shown to survive at room temperature for a world record 39 minutes, overcoming a key barrier towards building ultrafast quantum computers.

[caption id="attachment_196" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Overcoming a Key Barrier Towards Building Ultrafast Quantum Computers www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-021 Overcoming a Key Barrier Towards Building Ultrafast Quantum Computers[/caption]

An international team including Stephanie Simmons of Oxford University, UK, report in this week’s Science a test performed by Mike Thewalt of Simon Fraser University, Canada, and colleagues. In conventional computers data is stored as a string of 1s and 0s. In the experiment quantum bits of information, ‘qubits’, were put into a ‘superposition’ state in which they can be both 1s and 0 at the same time – enabling them to perform multiple calculations simultaneously.

In the experiment the team raised the temperature of a system, in which information is encoded in the nuclei of phosphorus atoms in silicon, from -269 °C to 25 °C and demonstrated that the superposition states survived at this balmy temperature for 39 minutes – outside of silicon the previous record for such a state’s survival at room temperature was around two seconds. The team even found that they could manipulate the qubits as the temperature of the system rose, and that they were robust enough for this information to survive being ‘refrozen’ (the optical technique used to read the qubits only works at very low temperatures).

‘39 minutes may not seem very long but as it only takes one-hundred-thousandth of a second to flip the nuclear spin of a phosphorus ion – the type of operation used to run quantum calculations – in theory over 20 million operations could be applied in the time it takes for the superposition to naturally decay by one percent. Having such robust, as well as long-lived, qubits could prove very helpful for anyone trying to build a quantum computer,’ said Stephanie Simmons of Oxford University’s Department of Materials, an author of the paper.

‘This opens up the possibility of truly long-term coherent information storage at room temperature,’ said Mike Thewalt of Simon Fraser University.

The team began with a sliver of silicon doped with small amounts of other elements, including phosphorus. Quantum information was encoded in the nuclei of the phosphorus atoms: each nucleus has an intrinsic quantum property called ‘spin’, which acts like a tiny bar magnet when placed in a magnetic field. Spins can be manipulated to point up (0), down (1), or any angle in between, representing a superposition of the two other states.
The team prepared their sample at just 4 °C above absolute zero (-269 °C) and placed it in a magnetic field. Additional magnetic field pulses were used to tilt the direction of the nuclear spin and create the superposition states. When the sample was held at this cryogenic temperature, the nuclear spins of about 37 per cent of the ions – a typical benchmark to measure quantum coherence – remained in their superposition state for three hours. The same fraction survived for 39 minutes when the temperature of the system was raised to 25 °C.

‘These lifetimes are at least ten times longer than those measured in previous experiments,’ said Stephanie Simmons. ‘We've managed to identify a system that seems to have basically no noise. They're high-performance qubits.’

There is still some work ahead before the team can carry out large-scale quantum computations. The nuclear spins of the 10 billion or so phosphorus ions used in this experiment were all placed in the same quantum state. To run calculations, however, physicists will need to place different qubits in different states. ‘To have them controllably talking to one another – that would address the last big remaining challenge,’ said Simmons.

For more information contact Stephanie Simmons of Oxford University on mobile; +44 (0)7823 333960 or email stephanie.simmons@materials.ox.ac.uk

IMAGES:

An artistic rendition of a 'bound exciton' quantum state used to prepare and read out the state of the qubits [credit: © 2013 Stef Simmons with CC BY]: http://www.ox.ac.uk/images/hi_res/17833_BoundExcitonalt.jpg

A phosphorus atom qubit in silicon can preserve quantum information for over 3 hours at cryogenic temperatures or 39 minutes at room temperature [credit: © 2013 Karl G. Nyman with CC BY]: http://www.ox.ac.uk/images/hi_res/17834_LongLivedQubitVariant2.jpg

Alternatively contact the University of Oxford Press Office on +44 (0)1865 283877 or email press.office@admin.ox.ac.uk




Notes:


  • A report of the research, entitled ‘Room-Temperature Quantum Bit Storage Exceeding 39 Minutes Using Ionized Donors in Silicon-28’, is published in this week’s Science.


News Release Source:  http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/news_releases_for_journalists/131115.html


Thursday, October 31, 2013

Successful Transfer of D-Wave Process Technology to Cypress Foundry

Successful Transfer of D-Wave Process Technology to Cypress Foundry


Cypress and D-Wave Systems Announce Successful Transfer of D-Wave Process Technology to Cypress Foundry.


SAN JOSE, Calif. and BURNABY, Canada, October 22, 2013 – Cypress Semiconductor Corp. (NASDAQ: CY) and D-Wave Systems Inc., the world's first commercial quantum computing company, today announced that D-Wave has successfully transferred its proprietary process technology for building quantum computing microprocessors to Cypress’s Wafer Foundry located in Bloomington, Minnesota. D-Wave selected Cypress as its foundry and started the site change in January of 2013, and Cypress delivered first silicon on June 26. Results from this lot indicate better yields than D-Wave has achieved in the past, validating the quality of Cypress’s production-scale environment.

[caption id="attachment_189" align="aligncenter" width="350"]Successful Transfer of D-Wave Process Technology to Cypress Foundry www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-020 Successful Transfer of D-Wave Process Technology to Cypress Foundry[/caption]

“The site change to Cypress will enable D-Wave to continue to scale its technology to meet its objective of delivering quantum processors that radically outperform conventional computing platforms,” said Eric Ladizinsky, D-Wave co-founder and Chief Scientist. “We selected Cypress as a foundry for their ability to support our unique materials and processing flow, while allowing us to leverage the consistency and yield of a production-scale wafer fab. The yield results we saw on first silicon exceeded our expectations and validate that Cypress was the right foundry choice for our technology development and processor production.”

“Cypress is very excited to support a pioneering customer such as D-Wave Systems in their quest to revolutionize computation,” said Mehran Sedigh, Vice President of Front-End Manufacturing at Cypress. “D-Wave’s selection of Cypress as a foundry, followed by the fast transfer of their technology and the yield improvements we have delivered, demonstrate our compelling offering. We expect to continue adding innovative companies to our list of wafer foundry customers.”

About D-Wave Systems

Founded in 1999, D-Wave's mission is to integrate new discoveries in physics and computer science into breakthrough approaches to computation. The company's flagship product, the 512-qubit D-Wave Two™ computer, is built around a novel type of superconducting processor that uses quantum mechanics to massively accelerate computation. Recently D-Wave announced the installation of a D-Wave Two system at the new Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab created jointly by NASA, Google and USRA. This came soon after Lockheed-Martin's purchase of an upgrade of their 128-qubit D-Wave One™ system to a 512-qubit D-Wave Two computer. With headquarters near Vancouver, Canada, the D-Wave U.S. offices are located in Palo Alto, California. D-Wave has a blue-chip investor base including Bezos Expeditions, Business Development Bank of Canada, Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Goldman Sachs, Growthworks, Harris & Harris Group, In-Q-Tel, International Investment and Underwriting, and Kensington Partners Limited. For more information, visit: www.dwavesys.com or learn more at www.youtube.com/user/dwavesystems.

About Cypress’s Fab 4

Cypress operates its own wafer fabrication facility in Bloomington, Minnesota, and offers access to this facility as a Specialty Foundry Solutions provider.  This 8-inch wafer fab manufactures in high volume down to the 90-nm node with 65nm capability. It offers process technologies that integrate SONOS-based nonvolatile memory and precision analog/mixed-signal capabilities.  The facility can handle ITAR material, and it has been accredited as a Category 1A Trusted Fab for fabrication, design, and testing of U.S. DoD Trusted Microelectronics. More information on Cypress Foundry Solutions is available online at www.cypress.com/go/foundry.

About Cypress

Cypress delivers high-performance, mixed-signal, programmable solutions that provide customers with rapid time-to-market and exceptional system value. Cypress offerings include the flagship PSoC® 1, PSoC 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5 programmable system-on-chip families. Cypress is a world leader in capacitive user interface solutions including CapSense® touch sensing, TrueTouch® touchscreens, and trackpad solutions for notebook PCs and peripherals. Cypress is a world leader in USB controllers, which enhance connectivity and performance in a wide range of consumer and industrial products. Cypress is also the world leader in SRAM and nonvolatile RAM memories. Cypress serves numerous major markets, including consumer, mobile handsets, computation, data communications, automotive, industrial, and military. Cypress trades on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the ticker symbol CY. Visit Cypress online at www.cypress.com.

News Source : http://www.pressreleasepoint.com/print/684618

Friday, September 20, 2013

Quantum Computing Market and PIC Market Worth $1,547.6 Million by 2022

Quantum Computing Market and Photonic Integrated Circuit Market Worth $1,547.6 Million by 2022


Quantum Computing Market research report categorizes the global PIC market, based on integration, raw materials and applications; it also covers the forecasted revenue from 2012 to 2022 and future applications of PIC.

[caption id="attachment_179" align="aligncenter" width="304"]Quantum Computing Market and PIC Market Worth $1,547.6 Million by 2022 www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-019 Quantum Computing Market and PIC Market Worth $1,547.6 Million by 2022[/caption]

(PRWEB) September 15, 2013

According to a new market research report “Photonic Integrated Circuit (IC) & Quantum Computing Market (2012 - 2022): By Application (Optical Fiber Communication, Optical Fiber Sensors, Biomedical); Components (Lasers, Attenuators); Raw Materials (Silica on Silicon, Silicon on Insulator)” published by MarketsandMarkets, the total market is expected to reach $1,547.6 million by 2022, at a CAGR of 26.3%.

Browse 104 market data tables with 30 figures spread through 236pages and in-depth TOC of “Photonic Integrated Circuit (IC) & Quantum Computing Market (2012 - 2022): by Application (Optical Fiber Communication, Optical Fiber Sensors, Biomedical); Components (Lasers, Attenuators); Raw Materials (Silica on Silicon, Silicon on Insulator)”.
http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/photonic-integrated-circuit-ic-optical-computing-chip-market-881.html

Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report.

Photonic integrated circuit (also known as planar light wave circuits or integrated optoelectronic devices) is a ground breaking technology that has revolutionized the optical network industry. Its ability to process large amount of data at huge speeds makes it an important contributor in enhancing the transmission capacity of optical fiber communications. PICs have changed the dynamics of the optical network industry by increasing optical performance and reliability while reducing physical size, power consumption and heat dissipation. Presently 500 Gbps PICs have been developed to deliver high-capacity transmission while optimizing power, cooling, space and operational simplicity. PICs are being developed for other applications like optical sensors, quantum computing and biomedical. Quantum computing is forecasted to be commercialized by 2017. It will take the market by storm from the moment it gets launched. It is predicted to grow at a phenomenal rate of 139.6% from 2017 to 2022.

The report gives a brief about the evolution of Photonic integrated circuits. The emergence of silicon photonics has changed market dynamics as it has enabled large scale production of PICs at low cost. Presently the market leaders are developing medium and large PICs capable of incorporating 100-1000 components/functions in a single InP based monolithic substrate.

This report describes the various types of integration techniques used to fabricate PICs. The integration techniques include module, hybrid and monolithic. The report covers the market of PICs based on these integration techniques across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and ROW. The market is also segmented according to the raw materials used to develop PICs. The raw materials consist of Lithium Niobate, Silica on Silicon, Silicon on Insulator, Indium Phosphide and Gallium Arsenide. The report also throws light on the PIC market according to various geographical regions. The geographical region covered here are North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and ROW.

Global PIC market is expected to reach $1,547.6 million by 2022, at an estimated CAGR of 26.3%. Presently North America is the biggest market for photonic integrated circuit followed by Europe and APAC. However APAC will emerge as the market leader by 2022 because of the prolific growth of datacenters and access network in that region.

Browse related reports

Micro Servers Market (2013 - 2018), by Processor Type (Intel, Arm, Amd), Component (Hardware, Software, Operating System), Application (Media Storage, Data Centers, Analytics, Cloud Computing) & Geography (North America, Europe, Apac, Row)
http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/micro-servers-market-952.html

Quantum Dots (QD) Market - Global Forecast & Analysis (2012 - 2022)
http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/quantum-dots-qd-market-694.html

About MarketsandMarkets

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MarketsandMarkets also provides multi-client reports, company profiles, databases, and custom research services. MarketsandMarkets covers thirteen industry verticals; including agriculture, advanced materials, automotives and transportation, banking and financial services, biotechnology, chemicals, consumer goods, telecommunications and IT, energy and power, food and beverages, industrial automation, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, semiconductor and electronics, aerospace & defense.

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Thursday, July 18, 2013

Spintronics Approach Enables New Quantum Technologies

Spintronics Approach Enables New Quantum Technologies


by Liyan


A team of researchers including members of the University of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering highlight the power of emerging quantum technologies in two recent papers published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). These technologies exploit quantum mechanics, the physics that dominates the atomic world, to perform disparate tasks such as nanoscale temperature measurement and processing quantum information with lasers.

[caption id="attachment_174" align="aligncenter" width="450"]Spintronics Approach Enables New Quantum Technologies Spintronics Approach Enables New Quantum Technologies[/caption]

The two papers are both based on the manipulation of the same material, an atomic-scale defect in diamond known as the nitrogen vacancy center. Both works also leverage the intrinsic "spin" of this defect for the applications in temperature measurement and information processing. This spintronics approach involves understanding and manipulating the spin of electronics for technological advancement.

"These studies build on research efforts undertaken over the last 20 years to isolate and control single electronic spins in the solid state," said David Awschalom, a principle investigator on both papers and a Liew Family Professor in Molecular Engineering at UChicago. "Much of the initial motivation for working in this field was driven by the desire to make new computing technologies based on the principles of quantum physics. In recent years the research focus has broadened as we've come to appreciate that these same principles could enable a new generation of nanoscale sensors."

Controlling qubits with light


In one PNAS paper posted April 22 and published in the May 7 print edition, Awschalom and six co-authors at the University of California, Santa Barbara and the University of Konstanz describe a technique that offers new routes toward the eventual creation of quantum computers, which would possess far more capability than modern classical computers.

In this application, Awschalom's team has developed protocols to fully control the quantum state of the defect with light instead of electronics. The quantum state of interest in this defect is its electronic spin, which acts as quantum bit, or qubit, the basic unit of a quantum computer. In classical computers, bits of information exist in one of only two states: zero or one. In the quantum mechanical realm, objects can exist in multiple states at once, enabling more complex processing.

This all-optical scheme for controlling qubits in semiconductors "obviates the need to have microwave circuits or electronic networks," Awschalom said. "Instead, everything can be done solely with photons, with light."

As a fully optical method, it shows promise as a more scalable approach to qubit control. In addition, this scheme is more versatile than conventional methods and could be used to explore quantum systems in a broad range of materials that might otherwise be difficult to develop as quantum devices.

Single spin thermometers


The quantum thermometer application, reported in a PNAS contribution posted online May 6 and published in the May 21 print edition, represents a new direction for the manipulation of quantum states, which is more commonly linked to computing, communications, and encryption. In recent years, defect spins had also emerged as promising candidates for nanoscale sensing of magnetic and electric fields at room temperature. With thermometry now added to the list, Awschalom foresees the possibility of developing a multifunctional probe based on quantum physics.

"With the same sensor you could measure magnetic fields, electric fields and now temperature, all with the same probe in the same place at approximately the same time," he said. "Perhaps most importantly, since the sensor is an atomic-scale defect that could be contained within nanometer-scale particles of diamond, you can imagine using this system as a thermometer in challenging environments such as living cells or microfluidic circuits."

The key aspect of this innovation is the development of control techniques for manipulating the spin that make it a much more sensitive probe of temperature shifts. "We've been exploring the potential of defect spins for thermometry for the past few years," said David Toyli, a graduate student in physics at UCSB and lead author of the temperature sensing work.

"This latest work is exciting because we've succeeded in adapting techniques used for stabilizing quantum information to measuring temperature-dependent changes in the quantum states. These techniques minimize the effects of environmental noise and allow us to make much more sensitive temperature measurements."

The team of researchers, also including Slava Dobrovitski of the Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory in Iowa, conducted experiments to determine the temperature range over which the spins could operate as a useful thermometer. It turns out that the particle spins can operate quite well at a wide temperature range, from room temperature to 500 degrees Kelvin (approximately 70 to 400 degrees Fahrenheit).

The chemical properties of a diamond-based thermometer also support the idea that this system could be useful for measuring temperature gradients in biological systems, such as the interior of living cells, Awschalom said. But the initial studies suggest the method is so flexible that it probably lends itself to uses yet to be imagined. "Like any new technology development, the exciting thing is what people will do with this now."

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About the Author:

Liyan

News Release Source : http://goarticles.com/article/Spintronics-Approach-Enables-New-Quantum-Technologies/7659627/

Monday, July 15, 2013

USC Study Validates Large-Scale Quantum Chip

USC (University of Southern California) Study Validates Large-Scale Quantum Chip   


by Softboook


In a newly published study, researchers from USC confirmed that quantum effects are indeed at play in the first commercial quantum optimization processor.

Scientists demonstrated that the D-Wave processor housed at the USC-Lockheed Martin Quantum Computing Center behaves in a manner that indicates that quantum mechanics has a functional role in the way it works. The demonstration involved a small subset of the chip's 128 qubits.

[caption id="attachment_170" align="aligncenter" width="450"]USC Study Validates Large-Scale Quantum Chip www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-018 USC Study Validates Large-Scale Quantum Chip[/caption]

In other words, the device appears to be operating as a quantum processor - something that scientists had hoped for but have needed extensive testing to verify.

The quantum processor was purchased from Canadian manufacturer D-Wave nearly two years ago by Lockheed Martin and housed at the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) based at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. As the first of its kind, the task for scientists putting it through its paces was to determine whether the quantum computer was operating as hoped.

"Using a specific test problem involving eight qubits, we have verified that the D-Wave processor performs optimization calculations [that is, finds lowest-energy solutions] using a procedure that is consistent with quantum annealing and is inconsistent with the predictions of classical annealing," said Daniel Lidar, scientific director of the Quantum Computing Center and one of the researchers on the team. Lidar holds joint appointments at USC Viterbi and the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.
Quantum annealing is a method of solving optimization problems using quantum mechanics - at a large enough scale, potentially much faster than a traditional processor can.

Research institutions throughout the world build and use quantum processors but most only have a few quantum bits, or qubits.

Qubits have the capability of encoding the two digits of one and zero at the same time, as opposed to traditional bits, which can encode distinctly either a one or a zero. This property, called superposition, along with the ability of quantum states to "tunnel" through energy barriers, are hoped to play a role in helping future generations of the D-Wave processor to ultimately perform optimization calculations much faster than traditional processors.

With 108 functional qubits, the D-Wave processor at USC inspired hopes for a significant advance in the field of quantum computing when it was installed in October 2011 - provided it worked as a quantum information processor. Quantum processors can fall victim to a phenomenon called decoherence, which stifles their ability to behave in a quantum fashion.

The USC team's research showed that the chip, in fact, performed largely as hoped, demonstrating the potential for quantum optimization on a larger-than-ever scale.

"Our work seems to show that, from a purely physical point of view, quantum effects play a functional role in information processing in the D-Wave processor," said Sergio Boixo, first author of the research paper, who conducted the research while he was a computer scientist at ISI and research assistant professor at USC Viterbi.

Boixo and Lidar collaborated with Tameem Albash, postdoctoral research associate in physics at USC Dornsife; Federico Spedalieri, computer scientist at ISI; and Nicholas Chancellor, a recent physics graduate at USC Dornsife

The news comes just two months after the Quantum Computing Center's original D-Wave processor - known commercially as the Rainier chip - was upgraded to a new 512-qubit Vesuvius chip. The computing center, which includes a magnetically shielded box that is kept frigid (near absolute zero) to protect the computer against decoherence, was designed to be upgradable to keep up with the latest developments in the field.

The new Vesuvius chip at USC is currently the only one in operation outside of D-Wave. A second such chip, owned by Google and housed at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., is expected to become operational later this year.

Next, the USC team will take the Vesuvius chip for a test drive, putting it through the same paces as the Rainier chip.

The research was supported by the Lockheed Martin Corp., the U.S. Army Research Office (grant number W911NF-12-1-0523), the National Science Foundation (grant number CHM-1037992), and the Army Research Office Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

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News Release Source : http://goarticles.com/article/USC-Study-Validates-Large-Scale-Quantum-Chip/7726734/

Friday, July 12, 2013

Rubidium Atoms Clouds use for Create Quantum Computer Memory

Studying Clouds of Rubidium Atoms Aims to Create Memory for Quantum Computers   


by Ivy


Talk about storing data in the cloud. Scientists at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland have taken this to a whole new level by demonstrating that they can store visual images within quite an ethereal memory device - a thin vapor of rubidium atoms. The effort may prove helpful in creating memory for quantum computers.

[caption id="attachment_165" align="aligncenter" width="450"]Rubidium Atoms Clouds use for Create Quantum Computer Memory www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-017 Rubidium Atoms Clouds use for Create Quantum Computer Memory[/caption]

Their work builds on an approach developed at the Australian National University, where scientists showed that a rubidium vapor could be manipulated in interesting ways using magnetic fields and lasers. The vapor is contained in a small tube and magnetized, and a laser pulse made up of multiple light frequencies is fired through the tube. The energy level of each rubidium atom changes depending on which frequency strikes it, and these changes within the vapor become a sort of fingerprint of the pulse's characteristics. If the field's orientation is flipped, a second pulse fired through the vapor takes on the exact characteristics of the first pulse - in essence, a readout of the fingerprint.

"With our paper, we've taken this same idea and applied it to storing an image - basically moving up from storing a single 'pixel' of light information to about a hundred," says Paul Lett, a physicist with JQI and NIST's Quantum Measurement Division. "By modifying their technique, we have been able to store a simple image in the vapor and extract pieces of it at different times."

It's a dramatic increase in the amount of information that can be stored and manipulated with this approach. But because atoms in a vapor are always in motion, the image can only be stored for about 10 milliseconds, and in any case the modifications the team made to the original technique introduce too much noise into the laser signal to make the improvements practically useful. So, should the term vaporware be applied here after all? Not quite, says Lett - because the whole point of the effort was not to build a device for market, but to learn more about how to create memory for next-generation quantum computers.

"What we've done here is store an image using classical physics. However, the ultimate goal is to store quantum information, which a quantum computer will need," he says. "Measuring what the rubidium atoms do as we manipulate them is teaching us how we might use them as quantum bits and what problems those bits might present. This way, when someone builds a solid-state system for a finished computer, we'll know how to handle them more effectively."

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News Release Source : http://goarticles.com/article/Studying-Clouds-of-Rubidium-Atoms-Aims-to-Creat-Memory-for-Quantum-Computers/7523353/

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Small step for quantum computing, giant leap for qubits

Sci-tech information: Small step for quantum computing, giant leap for qubits


by Lynn@ghq


Australian researchers have taken the next step in an incremental journey to developing the first large-scale quantum computer.

The world's potentially fastest computer system will be made up of tricky little building blocks called quantum bits, or qubits -- consisting of a single electron bound to a phosphorus atom.

[caption id="attachment_159" align="aligncenter" width="443"]Small step for quantum computing, giant leap for qubits www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-016 Small step for quantum computing, giant leap for qubits[/caption]

Information is stored in the spin of each qubit electron, which can be moving in two directions at once. The qubits need to be placed with atomic precision, only a few nanometres apart, for the system to work.

Scientists have previously encountered difficulties in making qubits, placing them so close together, distinguishing individual qubits from their neighbours, and controlling their spin independently.

University of New South Wales (UNSW) researchers, who prefer to work with qubits in a silicon chip, have proposed a solution to each of these challenges, working with Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico.

"It is a daunting challenge to rotate the spin of each qubit individually," said Holger Bch, lead author of the new study.

"But if each electron is hosted by a different number of phosphorus atoms, then the qubits will respond to different electromagnetic fields -- and each qubit can be distinguished from the others around it," he said.

The researchers say they are now one step closer to realising a practical, large-scale quantum computer -- the supercomputer of the future.

"This first demonstration that we can maintain long spin lifetimes of electrons on multi-donor systems is very powerful. It offers a new method for addressing individual qubits," said Michelle Simmons, UNSW Australian Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology director.

"This is an elegant and satisfying piece of work," she said.

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Source: http://goarticles.com/article/Sci-Tech-Information-Small-Step-for-Quantum-Computing-Giant-Leap-for-Qubits/7699232/

Monday, July 1, 2013

Scientists Found a New Technique to Store Quantum States

Scientists Found a New Technique to Store Quantum States


by Ivy


Researchers at the University of Sydney and Dartmouth College have developed a new way to design quantum memory, bringing quantum computers a step closer to reality. The results appear in the journal Nature Communications.

[caption id="attachment_150" align="aligncenter" width="450"]Scientists Found a New Technique to Store Quantum States Scientists Found a New Technique to Store Quantum States[/caption]

Quantum computing may revolutionize information processing, by providing a means to solve problems too complex for traditional computers, with applications in code breaking, materials science and physics. But figuring out how to engineer such a machine, including vital subsystems like quantum memory, remains elusive.

In the worldwide drive to build a useful quantum computer, the simple-sounding task of effectively preserving quantum information in a quantum memory is a major challenge. The same physics that makes quantum computers potentially powerful also makes them likely to experience errors, even when quantum information is just being stored idly in memory. Keeping quantum information alive  for long periods, while remaining accessible to the computer, is a key problem.

The Sydney-Dartmouth team  results demonstrate a path to what is considered a holy grail in the research community: storing quantum states with high fidelity for exceptionally long times, even hours according to their calculations. Today, most quantum states survive for tiny fractions of a second.

"Our new approach allows us to simultaneously achieve very low error rates and very long storage times, said co-senior author Dr. Michael J. Biercuk,  director of the Quantum Control Laboratory in the University of Sydney  School of Physics and ARC Center for Engineered Quantum Systems. But our work also addresses a vital practical issue - providing small access latencies, enabling on-demand retrieval with only a short time lag to extract stored information.

The team  new method is based on techniques to build in error resilience at the level of the quantum memory hardware, said Dartmouth Physics Professor Lorenza Viola, a co-senior author who is leading the quantum control theory effort and the Quantum Information Initiative at Dartmouth.

"Weve now developed the quantum firmware  appropriate to control a practically useful quantum memory, added Biercuk. But vitally, we've shown that with our approach a user may guarantee that error never grows beyond a certain level even after very long times, so long as certain constraints are met. The conditions we establish for the memory to function as advertised then inform system engineers how they can construct an efficient and effective quantum memory. Our method even incorporates a wide variety of realistic experimental imperfections.

The study was supported by the U.S. Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, and ARC Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems.

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Friday, June 28, 2013

Paper presents effect of thermal noise on quantum annealing

Quantum Computing Firm D-Wave Systems Announces Publication of New Peer-Reviewed Paper in Nature Communications


BURNABY, British Columbia and PALO ALTO, Calif., May 22, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- D-Wave Systems Inc., the world's first commercial quantum computing company, today announced the publication of a peer-reviewed paper entitled "Thermally assisted quantum annealing of a 16-qubit problem" in the journal Nature Communications.


The paper presents the results of the first experimental exploration of the effect of thermal noise on quantum annealing. Quantum annealing is the process by which qubits, the basic unit of information in a quantum computer, are slowly tuned (annealed) from their superposition state (where they are 0 and 1 at the same time) into a classical state (where they are either 0 or 1). D-Wave quantum computers use this process to solve optimization problems in which many criteria need to be considered in order to come up with the best solution. These types of problems exist in many disciplines, such as cancer research, image recognition, software verification, financial analysis and logistics.




[caption id="attachment_146" align="aligncenter" width="500"]The paper presents the results of the first experimental exploration of the effect of thermal noise on quantum annealing www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-014 Paper presents effect of thermal noise on quantum annealing[/caption]

Using 16 qubits within a D-Wave processor, the experiments demonstrated that, for the problem studied, even with annealing times eight orders of magnitude longer than the predicted single-qubit decoherence time (the typical time it takes for environmental factors to start to corrupt the state of a qubit), the probabilities of performing a successful computation are similar to those expected for a fully coherent system. The experiments also demonstrated that by repeatedly annealing the open system quickly several times rather than annealing a hypothetical closed system slowly once, quantum annealing can take advantage of a thermal environment to achieve a speedup factor of up to 1,000 over the closed system (a closed system is one which does not interact with its environment, whereas an open system does interact with it).


"Our experiments demonstrated that mechanisms that many believed would disrupt quantum annealing (or AQC) calculations based on theoretical analyses of hypothetical, closed quantum systems operating at zero temperature don't necessarily do so for real, open quantum systems operating at finite temperature," said Eric Ladizinsky, co-founder and Chief Scientist of D-Wave. "One example of this, described in the paper, is that we found that a small amount of thermal noise (generally thought to be universally bad) can actually enhance problem solving effectiveness, rather than diminish it.  As all real quantum computers will inevitably be open quantum systems operating at finite temperature we hope our paper will encourage others to think more deeply about the prospects of quantum computing in open quantum systems."


This paper is the latest in a long line of peer-reviewed papers from D-Wave scientists. Earlier this year, D-Wave published another paper in Scientific Reports, a Nature Publishing Group journal, discussing the effect of environmental decoherence on the ground state during adiabatic quantum computation. Over the past decade, almost 60 peer-reviewed papers authored by scientists at D-Wave have been published in prestigious journals, including NaturePhysical ReviewScienceQuantum Information Processing, and the Journal of Computational Physics (see http://www.dwavesys.com/en/publications.html).


About D-Wave Systems Inc.


Founded in 1999, D-Wave's mission is to integrate new discoveries in physics and computer science into breakthrough approaches to computation. The company's flagship product, the 512-qubit D-Wave Two™ computer, is built around a novel type of superconducting processor that uses quantum mechanics to massively accelerate computation. Recently D-Wave announced the installation of a D-Wave Two at the new Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab created jointly by that NASA, Google and USRA. This came soon after Lockheed-Martin's purchase of an upgrade of their 128-qubit D-Wave One™ system to a 512-qubit D-Wave Two. With headquarters near Vancouver, Canada, the D-Wave U.S. offices are located in Palo Alto, California. D‑Wave has a blue-chip investor base including Bezos Expeditions, Business Development Bank of Canada, Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Goldman Sachs, Growthworks, Harris & Harris Group, In-Q-Tel, International Investment and Underwriting, and Kensington Partners Limited. For more information, visit: www.dwavesys.com or learn more atwww.youtube.com/user/dwavesystems.


Media contact: Janice Odell - 415. 738.2165 - jan@fordodell.com


This press release may contain forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.


 SOURCE D-Wave Systems Inc.

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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Quantum Computing Firm D-Wave Systems Announces Milestone of 100 U.S. Patents Granted

Quantum Computing Firm D-Wave Systems Announces Milestone of 100 U.S. Patents Granted


- Patent Portfolio also Rated #4 in Computing Systems by IEEE Spectrum in Latest Quality Assessment


BURNABY, British Columbia and PALO ALTO, Calif., June 20, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- D-Wave Systems Inc., the world's first commercial quantum computing company, today announced it has been granted its 100th patent by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. This is an important milestone for the company, whose patent portfolio was also rated #4 in the Computer Systems category by IEEE Spectrum this past December, just behind computing giants IBM, HP and Fujitsu.




[caption id="attachment_142" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Quantum Computing Firm D-Wave Systems Announces Milestone of 100 U.S. Patents Granted www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-013 Quantum Computing Firm D-Wave Systems                      Announces Milestone of 100 U.S. Patents Granted[/caption]

In order to build the world's first commercial quantum computer, D-Wave needed to significantly advance the state-of-the-art in a diverse set of domains in physics, system architecture, manufacturing and computer science. This ranged from the science of quantum computing to the development, fabrication and manufacturing of all elements of the system from the superconducting qubits to the quantum processor to the magnetic shielding and cooling and the software and algorithms.


In December of 2012, IEEE Spectrum announced their sixth Patent Power scorecard. According to IEEE Spectrum, "The scorecards are based on objective, quantitative benchmarking of the patent portfolios of more than 5000 leading commercial enterprises, academic institutions, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies. This benchmarking—carried out by us at 1790 Analytics, based in Haddonfield, N.J.—takes into account not only the size of organizations' patent portfolios but also the quality, as reflected in characteristics such as growth, impact, originality, and general applicability."


"Both the 100 patent milestone and the recognition by IEEE Spectrum for our patent quality is a reflection of the number of breakthroughs the company has made in order to actually develop, manufacture, sell and install the first commercial quantum computers," said Vern Brownell, D-Wave CEO. "The fact that D-Wave's patent portfolio is rated # 4 in a list that includes industry leaders like IBM, HP, Fujitsu, NEC, Dell, Cray and SGI is a testament to the hard work, dedication and passion of the D-Wave team. Furthermore, many of the breakthroughs these patents represent have been documented in more than 60 peer-reviewed scientific publications. I congratulate everyone at D-Wave for these achievements and for the commercial success that has resulted."


About D-Wave Systems Inc. Founded in 1999, D-Wave's mission is to integrate new discoveries in physics and computer science into breakthrough approaches to computation. The company's flagship product, the 512-qubit D-Wave Two™ computer, is built around a novel type of superconducting processor that uses quantum mechanics to massively accelerate computation. Recently D-Wave announced the installation of a D-Wave Two system at the new Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab created jointly by NASA, Google and USRA. This came soon after Lockheed-Martin's purchase of an upgrade of their 128-qubit D-Wave One™ system to a 512-qubit D-Wave Two computer. With headquarters near Vancouver, Canada, the D-Wave U.S. offices are located in Palo Alto, California. D‑Wave has a blue-chip investor base including Bezos Expeditions, Business Development Bank of Canada, Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Goldman Sachs, Growthworks, Harris & Harris Group, In-Q-Tel, International Investment and Underwriting, and Kensington Partners Limited. For more information, visit: www.dwavesys.comor learn more at www.youtube.com/user/dwavesystems • Contact: Janice Odell, 415.738.2165 • jan@fordodell.com


This press release may contain forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.


SOURCE D-Wave Systems Inc.
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News Release Link : http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/quantum-computing-firm-d-wave-systems-announces-milestone-of-100-us-patents-granted-212283621.html

Friday, June 21, 2013

Scientists Hint at Smartphone-Sized Quantum Computers

Scientists Hint at Smartphone-Sized Quantum Computers


By Manikandan Raman


Researchers say smartphone-sized quantum computers could be developed with the help of microwaves and ions, hinting at the possibility of smaller quantum computing devices in the future.

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have for the first time linked the quantum properties of two separated ions by manipulating them with microwaves rather than the usual laser beams.

[caption id="attachment_135" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Scientists Hint at Smartphone-Sized Quantum Computers www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-012 Scientists Hint at Smartphone-Sized Quantum Computers[/caption]

They suggest it may be possible to replace an exotic room-sized quantum computing "laser park" with miniaturized, commercial microwave technology similar to that used in smart phones.

"It's conceivable a modest-sized quantum computer could eventually look like a smart phone combined with a laser pointer-like device, while sophisticated machines might have an overall footprint comparable to a regular desktop PC," says NIST physicist Dietrich Leibfried.

Scientists say microwave components could be expanded and upgraded more easily to build practical systems of thousands of ions for quantum computing and simulations, compared to complex, expensive laser sources.

Though microwaves, the carrier of wireless communications, have been used earlier to manipulate single ions, NIST researchers are the first to position microwaves sources close enough to the ions-just 30 micrometers away-and create the conditions enabling entanglement.

Entanglement is a quantum phenomenon expected to be crucial for transporting information and correcting errors in quantum computers.

Scientists integrated wiring for microwave sources directly on a chip-sized ion trap and used a desktop-scale table of lasers, mirrors and lenses that is only about one-tenth of the size previously required. Though low-power ultraviolet lasers are still needed to cool the ions and observe experimental results, it might eventually be made as small as those in portable DVD players.

"Although quantum computers are not thought of as convenience devices that everybody wants to carry around, they could use microwave electronics similar to what is used in smart phones. These components are well developed for a mass market to support innovation and reduce costs. The prospect excites us," Leibfried added.

Ions are a leading candidate for use as quantum bits, or qubits, to hold information in a quantum computer. Although other promising candidates for qubits-notably superconducting circuits, or "artificial atoms"-are manipulated on chips with microwaves, ion qubits are at a more advanced stage experimentally in that more ions can be controlled with better accuracy and less loss of information.

In the latest experiments, the NIST team used microwaves to rotate the "spins" of individual magnesium ions and entangle the spins of a pair of ions. This is a "universal" set of quantum logic operations because rotations and entanglement can be combined in sequence to perform any calculation allowed by quantum mechanics, Leibfried says.

In the experiments, the two ions were held by electromagnetic fields, hovering above an ion trap chip consisting of gold electrodes electroplated onto an aluminum nitride backing. Some of the electrodes were activated to create pulses of oscillating microwave radiation around the ions. Radiation frequencies are in the 1 to 2 gigahertz range.

The microwaves produce magnetic fields used to rotate the ions' spins, which can be thought of as tiny bar magnets pointing in different directions. The orientation of these tiny bar magnets is one of the quantum properties used to represent information.

Scientists entangled the ions by adapting a technique they first developed with lasers. If the microwaves' magnetic fields gradually increase across the ions in just the right way, the ions' motion can be excited depending on the spin orientations, and the spins can become entangled in the process.

Scientists had to find the right combination of settings in the three electrodes that provided the optimal change in the oscillating magnetic fields across the extent of the ions' motion while minimizing other, unwanted effects. The properties of the entangled ions are linked, such that a measurement of one ion would reveal the state of the other.

A quantum computer is a device for computation making direct use of quantum mechanical phenomena, such as superposition and entanglement, to perform operations on data. The basic principle behind quantum computation is that quantum properties can be used to represent data and perform operations on these data.

Quantum computers would harness the unusual rules of quantum physics to solve certain problems-such as breaking today's most widely used data encryption codes, which are currently intractable even with supercomputers.

A nearer-term goal is to design quantum simulations of important scientific problems, to explore quantum mysteries such as high-temperature superconductivity, the disappearance of electrical resistance in certain materials when sufficiently chilled.

Scientists say the use of microwaves reduces errors introduced by instabilities in laser beam pointing and power as well as laser-induced spontaneous emissions by the ions. However, microwave operations need to be improved to enable practical quantum computations or simulations.

There is still a long way to go. The NIST researchers achieved only entanglement 76 percent of the time, compared with the best laser-controlled operations at 99.3 percent.

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Friday, June 14, 2013

New Quantum Artificial Intelligence Initiative

D-Wave Two™ Quantum Computer Selected for New Quantum Artificial Intelligence Initiative


System to be Installed at NASA's Ames Research Center, and Operational in Q3


BURNABY, British Columbia and PALO ALTO, Calif., May 16, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- D-Wave Systems Inc., the world's first commercial quantum computing company, today announced that its new 512-qubit quantum computer, the D-Wave Two, will be installed at the new Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab, a collaboration among NASA, Google and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The purpose of this effort is to use quantum computing to advance machine learning in order to solve some of the most challenging computer science problems. Installation has already begun at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, and the system is expected to be available to researchers during Q3.




[caption id="attachment_99" align="aligncenter" width="450"]D-Wave Two™ Quantum Computer Selected for New Quantum Artificial Intelligence Initiative www.quantumcomputingtechnologyaustralia.com-011 D-Wave Two™ Quantum Computer Selected for                                              New Quantum Artificial Intelligence Initiative[/caption]

 

 

Researchers at Google, NASA and USRA expect to use the D-Wave system to develop applications for a broad range of complex problems such as machine learning, web search, speech recognition, planning and scheduling, search for exoplanets, and support operations in mission control centers. Via USRA the system will also be available to the broader U.S. academic community.


"D-Wave has made significant strides in the technology, application and now commercialization of quantum computing," saidSteve Conway, IDC research vice president for high performance computing. "The order for a D-Wave Two system for the initiative launched by NASA, Google and USRA attests to the revolutionary potential of this fundamentally different approach to computing for both industry and government. HPC buyers and users are looking for ways to speed up their applications beyond what contemporary technologies can deliver. IDC believes organizations that depend on leading-edge technology would do well to begin exploring the possibilities for quantum computing."


As part of the selection process, Google, NASA and USRA created a series of benchmark and acceptance tests that the new D-Wave 512-qubit system was required to pass before the installation at NASA Ames could proceed. In all cases, the D-Wave Two system met or exceeded the required performance specifications, in some cases by a large margin.


"We are extremely pleased to make this announcement," stated Vern Brownell, CEO of D-Wave. "Three world class organizations and their research teams will use the D-Wave Two to develop real world applications and to support research from leading academic institutions. This joint effort shows that quantum computing has expanded beyond the theoretical realm and into the worlds of business and technology."


About D-Wave Systems Inc.


Founded in 1999, D-Wave's mission is to integrate new discoveries in physics and computer science into breakthrough approaches to computation that serves business. The company's flagship product, the 512-qubit D-Wave Two™ computer, is built around a novel type of superconducting processor that uses quantum mechanics to massively accelerate computation. The NASA/Google/USRA installation marks a significant broadening of D-Wave's customer base, and comes on the heels of Lockheed-Martin's purchase of an upgrade of their 128-qubit D-Wave One™ system to a 512-qubit D-Wave Two earlier in this year. With headquarters near Vancouver, Canada, the D-Wave U.S. offices are located in Palo Alto, California. D‑Wave has a blue-chip investor base including Bezos Expeditions, Business Development Bank of Canada, Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Goldman Sachs, Growthworks, Harris & Harris Group, In-Q-Tel, International Investment and Underwriting, and Kensington Partners Limited. For more information, visit: www.dwavesys.com or learn more at www.youtube.com/user/dwavesystems


Media contact: Janice Odell • 415. 738.2165 • jan@fordodell.com


This press release may contain forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.


SOURCE D-Wave Systems Inc.

RELATED LINKS
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Source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/d-wave-two-quantum-computer-selected-for-new-quantum-artificial-intelligence-initiative-207674881.html